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Author: Michael Rowe

#30 – Grand narratives in simulation-based education

In this episode, Ben and Michael speak to Shane Pritchard about using the concept of a ‘grand narrative’ to structure a simulation programme at scale, across multiple disciplines, in schools of health and social care. We’re all familiar with simulation-based activities within, and maybe even across, disciplinary programmes. But what would it take to build a simulation programme across an entire school?

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#29 – Generative AI and assessment

In this episode, we discuss the implications of generative AI on assessment, and on learning and teaching more broadly. This was a wide-ranging conversation that explored some of the detail around how language models work, it’s inability to compare responses to valid models of the world, practical uses for AI in teaching, learning, and assessment, and the risks of having AI being trained on data generated by AI.

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#28 – A pedagogy of space (Unconference 2022)

In this episode, Michael Rowe talks about space as a metaphor for learning and asks if it’s still a useful way for us to think about learning and teaching design. Spatial metaphors encourage a certain vocabulary that informs our cognitive frameworks, which possibly limits creative approaches to learning and teaching. Michael asks if other metaphors for learning might get us closer to designing learning experiences that are more aligned with what we care about.

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#27 – Student-led curriculum development (Unconference 2022)

In this episode of the In beta podcast, Joost van Wijchen explores the topic of student-led collaborative curriculum design. As part of the process, Joost interviewed physiotherapy lecturers and students, and shared some of his own experiences at two physiotherapy departments.

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#26 – Critical perspectives on simulation (Unconference 2022)

In this episode, Shane Pritchard, Ben and Michael talk about the increasing use of simulation in professional education, and ask if the definitions of what counts as simulation are being stretched beyond breaking point. We take a critical look at what we mean when we talk about simulation and explore how we might incorporate it into the curriculum.

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